Goodbye to the British Library, hello corporate life.

I’ve moved on.  I had a great couple of years working at the library and met a ton of really enthusiastic folk.  The ODIN project came to an end and there was little left for me to do, so I’ve found myself a new workplace more local to home.

I’m a delivery engineer, apparently.  I’ve been here a couple of days and I’m still not sure what I’ll be delivering, but otherwise first impressions are very good.  I’m currently sat in a room full of graduates writing some sort of game and they seem to be enjoying themselves.  There’s a Waitrose round the corner meaning I get a couple of free coffees a day and soon I’ll be able to cycle to work.  Working from home has piled on the pounds so burning it off with cycle power would be fantastic.  It’s a corporate code shop, but seems agile and modern in it’s approach.  Time will tell, but all my kit is top notch and they support staff and HR have been great.

I’ll continue posting technical blog posts on whatever I’m working on as and when I encounter new stuff myself, which I think is going to be rather a lot in the coming months :)

 

ETD2014 slides

I’m having a great time attending the ETD2014 conference.  There’s been lots of lively discussion around ORCiD and DOIs and it’s been fantastic to gather wider perspectives.  It’s also been great to get some coding in adapting the import tool to work with the Leicester institutional repository.

For those that are interested in the ORCiD integration I was discussing earlier, the live application can be found at http://ethos-orcid.appspot.com and the code at https://github.com/TomDemeranville/ I’ve popped the slides on figshare (http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1117858)

 

ELAG2014 – Slides

I recently presented at ELAG2014 about ORCiD integration.  I’ve embedded my slides below.  They might not make quite as much sense without context – they’re mainly pictures with single word topic headings, but they contain links to the source code etc.

I had a great time and met a lot of interesting folks whilst at ELAG.  I’m now in contact with two UK universities looking at ORCiD integration so I think it’s been useful.

I’ll add some commentary and a summary of the talk later this week.

Rather appropriately this is up on figshare – an open data repository that lets you upload anything then assigns it a DOI. This one has http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1057954

 

 

A different view of the British Library – photos

Once you get inside it, the British Library is a beautiful building.  I’ve taken to photographing it and its contents during my lunch break.  Here they are, click on them for the bigger versions.

Check out my flickr stream for more.

The age of geocities – Bubba says HOWDY!!!

There’s a fantastic project out there that’s taking screenshots of random Geocites pages as they would have appeared when they were live.

It’s strangely compelling viewing.

bubba says howdy!!!

bubba says howdy!!!

Sites like these showcase an important aspect of our cultural heritage.  Back when the internet was called the “information superhighway” and people were still talking about the “digital frontier”, Geocites was where you could stake your claim.

I did it myself once.  I set up my own little homestead that hosted a Java Applet I’d written – a Java version of the classic game Elite.  I couldn’t get the flight engine quite right, but you could trade from Lave to Diso, view things on the radar, travel between systems and view all the original craft in their rotating vector glory.  The site is sadly lost but the memories remain.

Grab yourself a bit of nostalgic indulgence here: http://oneterabyteofkilobyteage.tumblr.com/

More background of the project can be found here: http://rhizome.org/editorial/2014/feb/10/authenticity-access-digital-preservation-geocities/

 

 

 

ORCiD tools – who’s claiming what?

As part of my work with data-centres and ORCiD I’ve put together a tool that lets you see where works claimed within ORCiD have been published.   Start typing a publisher into the search box and it’ll look up the DOI prefix (or other identifier prefix) for that publisher from a list nearly 4000 long.  Current highlights include the American Helicopter Society with 9 ORCiDs.

See it in action at http://ethos-orcid.appspot.com/search

Why?

One of the things that’s repeatedly come up when talking to data-centres about author metadata is that while it’s easy to push data in, it’s pretty hard to get it back out.  Recent changes in the ORCiD API have made this easier, hence this tool.

Many datasets have scant author metadata, with little more that an institution name attributed to them.  Datacentres can now pull the claims information out of ORCiD and use it to selectively enrich their own metadata, completing a “virtuous circle” of integration.

Source code?

This code is available as part of the orcid-update-java application, which uses the orcid-java-client library.