Posts Categorized: Ramblings

  • Ramblings

    The obligatory “what’s the point of a personal blog these days?” post

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    Yeah. That post. I started this blog way back when it didn’t seem that weird of a thing to do. Now days it seems personal sites are used as CVs, and I’m not really into that. (1) Nobody is going to hire me for my pottery skills or the small contributions I’ve made to stackoverflow… Read more »

  • Ramblings

    How to load the ORCID data dump into mongo, without dying of old age

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    Since writing this post, I’ve worked out a better way of doing things – use python to read directly from the tar file and inject the results into Mongo! I used in with the 2017 ORCID data dump and it’s like lightning compared to the method described below.  Basically download the script and run:

    Read more »

  • Ramblings

    Did I mention I’m a potter?

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    I’ve not posted about much on here other than programming, but well, that’s a bit dull after a while.  What’s really interesting, for me at least, is POTTERY.  Yeah, I said it.  Pottery. I recently got back into throwing pots after a 20 year hiatus.  I rekindled my love of clay so much I ended up… Read more »

  • Programming, Ramblings

    C# FluentValidation – why we’re using it

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    A bit of background I’ve been working in the C# world for a few months now. While the code is very similar to Java,the culture around open source could not be more different.  Where open source as business as usual in the Java & Javascript worlds, it’s very much exceptional circumstances only in the .Net one…. Read more »

  • Ramblings

    ORCiD Java Client now supports schema version 1.2!

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    UPDATE: This is a really dead post :D.  ORCID is now on V3.0 of the API and the library has been deprecated. Thanks to the hard work of Stephan Windmüller (@Stovocor) the ORCiD client library now supports version 1.2 of the ORCiD schema.  He’s also updated the companion ORCiD profile updater web app to use the… Read more »

  • Programming, Ramblings

    Delphi isn’t quite dead yet.

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    Back when I was a lowly junior programmer, life was great. We had a humongous 64k of memory to play with, two whole (user defined!) colours and an 80 character width screen.  We managed gigantic millions of member pension schemes using the equivalent of a commodore 64.  Recursive functions meant stack overflow.  Not one of these… Read more »

  • Ramblings

    Goodbye to the British Library, hello corporate life.

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    I’ve moved on.  I had a great couple of years working at the library and met a ton of really enthusiastic folk.  The ODIN project came to an end and there was little left for me to do, so I’ve found myself a new workplace more local to home. I’m a delivery engineer, apparently.  I’ve been… Read more »

  • Ramblings

    A different view of the British Library – photos

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    Once you get inside it, the British Library is a beautiful building.  I’ve taken to photographing it and its contents during my lunch break.  Here they are, click on them for the bigger versions. [flickr_set id=”72157644588723053″] Check out my flickr stream for more.

  • Ramblings

    The age of geocities – Bubba says HOWDY!!!

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    There’s a fantastic project out there that’s taking screenshots of random Geocites pages as they would have appeared when they were live. It’s strangely compelling viewing. Sites like these showcase an important aspect of our cultural heritage.  Back when the internet was called the “information superhighway” and people were still talking about the “digital frontier”, Geocites… Read more »

  • Ramblings

    I didn’t go to university to get myself a job

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    Chris Bourg has written a great piece about the insidiousness of neo-liberalism and education-as-an-investment over at her blog, check it out here: The Neoliberal Library: Resistance is not futile I am one of those hopeless idealists who still believes that education is – or should be – a social and public good rather than a private one,… Read more »